Tuesday, April 28, 2015

Season 3, Episode 9 - The Footfalls Within


"And Solomon Kane shuddered, for he had looked on Life that was not Life as he knew it, and had dealt and witnessed Death that was not Death as he knew it." 

Hile, adventurers! Today's show focuses on The Footfalls Within. This story, first published in Weird Tales in September 1931, is the final complete story on our Road of Vengeance. Needless to say, this turns out to be one of our favorites!
Art by Gary Gianni

One Things for the episode include:
Jon: Justified, which just came to its grand conclusion on FX!
Josh: Sheik, a documentary of one of the greatest heel wrestlers of all time!
Luke: Room 237, a documentary about Kubrick's The Shining!

Next time... Solomon Kane goes to Hollywood!

Our episode is freely available on archive.org and is licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/

Beginning theme: "Sudden Defeat" by Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under Creative Commons: By Attribution 3.0.

Since we followed a caravan across a mystic landscape in this episode, our closing song for this episode is "Planet Caravan," as covered by Mercury Rev. All music was obtained legally; we hope our discussion of this content makes you want to go out and purchase the work! Check out Mercury Rev, and dig into some psychedelia!

Questions? Comments? Curses? Email us! (thecromcast at gmail dot com)

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1 comment:

  1. I had not read this particular story before, but, listening to you talk about it, I wondered if maybe this episode was inspired by David Livingstone's experience with an Arab slaver caravan in East Africa in the early 1870s -
    I recently read an article about Livingstone's formerly illegible diary being scanned by some researchers to decipher the faded text that had been written in berry juice:

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/decoding-lost-diary-david-livingstone-180953385/?utm_source=smithsoniantopic&no-ist

    and though i gather that some specific details in the diary had been unknown until the recent analysis, I think the event of Livingstone joining up with the slave caravan had been published in his own time and would have probably been familiar to Howard: I think Livingstone was a well known figure in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.
    I wonder also if Livingstone, the British religious zealot who disappeared into the unknown heart of Africa, may have been a point of inspiration for Solomon Kane in general, at least in his African adventure period?

    I've been thinking about other correspondences with historical events, knowing that Howard was an avid reader of history. One specific event in Wings in the Night made me think of something, though i didn't mention it then because the resemblance seemed probably due to chance and that I only thought of it because of things i had been reading recently:
    The image of the old chief Kuroba with his axe facing down the creatures by himself made me think of an episode from the Hernando De Soto expedition. De Soto and the Spanish entered the main town of the province of Quizquiz, probably a Tunican state just south of where Memphis is now, at a time when most of the men of Quizquiz were outside of the town, working in the fields and on the river. The king, who was old, sick, and in no shape to be fighting anyone, got up from his bed, picked up a battle axe, and came down from his mound screaming at the Spaniards that he would kill them all. Obviously this did not happen; the Spanish tried to extort some things from Quizquiz using captives and booty they had taken, but meanwhile the people outside the walls mustered up several thousand armed men ready to throw down, and the Spanish backed down and gave back the captives.

    I have no idea if this is what Howard was thinking of, and it's probably just me, but i think it would be interesting to try to figure out if Howard was making reference to actual historical events in his fantasy stories.

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